Sunday, March 7, 2021

Comments? Questions?
Send them to Pete at: ReleaseNotes@
comicbase.com
 

2007

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

February

January


2006

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

February

January


2005

December

November

October

September

August

July


 

December 31, 2006

Big Numbers: The 2006 End-of-Year Update

For posterity’s sake, here’s how we closed out 2006:

ComicBase 11 now lists the prices and details on 310,616 issues, featuring 25,005 different titles from 3,006 different publishers. Boiled down to its essence, that’s practically every comic published in the English language since the late 1800s.

ComicBase Archive Edition now includes more than 150,000 pictures, over 70,000 of which are now in full-size, high-definition format.

There’ve also been countless, harder-to-measure improvements in ComicBase, most notably the more than 75,000 issue additions and changes just since we released ComicBase 11, some five months ago, including countless price updates, note, storyline, writer, and artist additions, and more. (All of this has been been part of the year of free, downloadable updates that are included with ComicBase 11).

ComicBase currently indexes the work of some 22,699 comic creators.

ComicBase’s oldest issue is Five Cent Wide Awake Library #1 from 1878. The newest is a tie between any of the two hundred and fifty or so that streeted this past Thursday.

That’s about it for me this year. 2006 was huge, and I hope that 2007 will be even better. For all of us.

Happy New Year!

-Pete


 

 

December 29, 2006

Biggest Weekly Update—Ever!

As we swigged hot chocolate and opened Christmas presents in the office last Friday, our servers were busy pushing out the largest weekly update since we started doing them. Along with the dozens of new titles and hundreds of new issues came a massive 10,098 issue updates. Yes, I wrote that correctly: Over 10,000 issue updates in a single week!

These ranged from new pricing and expanded creator credits and filling in cover dates, bar codes, and other details from older issues. It’s a staggering amount of information, and I wanted to thank everyone who contributed. (And boy, if you’re not using ComicBase 11 to download each week’s updates, you’re missing a lot!)

 


We’ve got Mail!

2,280 Update Emails…

…And that’s just this weekend!

Wow! I’m not sure if I knew what we’d be getting into when we introduced our weekly updates and the “Submit New or Corrected Data” command, but you guys have definitely been keeping us busy—very, very busy! Thanks to everyone for all the new picture submissions, issue information, and corrections!

 


December 15 , 2006

Cool Books, Part 1

The Future and Its Enemies

Future and its Enemies

I never get enough of a chance to read — books, that is. (Email... that I read by the truckload, thanks). In any case, on the rare occasion I get to curl up with a book containing neither pictures nor code samples, it’s a real treat. This makes me especially bitter when the book in question winds up being tedious, but it also makes me doubly happy when the book proves insightful and inspiring.

Virginia Postrel’s “The Future and Its Enemies” is mostly the latter, although I can’t help but feel that you could shave its length by 50 pages without anyone noticing much gone missing. That said, the social critic does a nice job of taking on the conflict between those who believe the future is best created through innumerable small innovations, enterprises, and experiments, and those who—usually through government control—believe the future is best designed by a select few, and the “one best solution” imposed upon everyone else.

Drawing on examples ranging from Disneyland to hair braiding to genetic engineering, she makes a good case for what she calls “dynamism” — the constant, chaotic changes which occur when people make their own decisions about their affairs. Seemingly indistinguishable from libertarianism (a term she avoids using throughout the book), she focuses not on politics, but on knowledge transference and social change.

In short, those who attempt to design the future are inevitably caught up short—either with comic or disastrous effect—by their inability to design from on high systems which stand up in a constantly changing world. Whether it’s timber preservation policies that unintentionally encourage clear-cutting, ridiculous Soviet-style attempts to legislate production quotas on the millions of items in an economy, or activists on the right and the left clamoring for a forced return to some imagined pastoral Golden Age, these efforts seem always to end in tragedy. In contrast, Postrel contends that the best hope for creating a better tomorrow lies in allowing people’s own, uncoordinated (and yes, greedy, selfish, unaesthetic, and sometimes downright oogy) actions in pursuit of their own ends.

There’s much more to the book, including a very salient analysis of the structures of good laws, and it definitely makes for a thought-provoking read. My thanks also go out to the folks at EconTalk for bringing both Postrel and this book to my attention.

 


December 6 , 2006

Dammit

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,234880,00.html

This one hit pretty close to home for me, and I was hoping against hope for James’ safety. It’s a heartbreaker.